Firstpost

Siva Vaidhyanathan is a cultural historian and an influential professor at the University of Virginia whose books explore the issues surrounding intellectual property rights, and how the regulations are more likely to inhibit original thought rather than encourage it.

more >
Toledo Blade

Democrats today will formally adopt a platform that attempts to bridge the camps of Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders without serving as an albatross around the nominee’s neck. “Most people are cynical and believe that what’s in a platform doesn’t matter,” said Larry Sabato, director of UVA’s Center for Politics. “That’s truly wrong. The best studies of platforms over the years indicate that two-thirds or three-fourths of pledges are either adopted in whole or part, or the elected official makes serious attempts to get them adopted in whole or part.”

more >
Townhall

In between the two conventions (hence the clever, if undecipherable, title) the only poll that was in the field during whole of last week was the LA Times/USC poll which, among likely voters, showed Donald Trump with a three-point lead over Hillary Clinton 45 percent to 42 percent. With the average convention bounce, according to UVA’s Larry Sabato, being 5.9 percent for Republicans, we can expect Trump to score about +2 post-convention.

more >
U.S. News & World Report

A former Virginia governor with foreign policy experience, Kaine has deep ties to President Barack Obama, who hand-picked him to run for the Senate, and is highly popular in his home state. "You can see he's from Virginia, which has been a key swing state in the last two presidential elections, and the outcome in Virginia most closely matched the national outcome," says Geoffrey Skelley, a political analyst at UVA’s Center for Politics.

more >
Massillon Independent

"There are still some Sanders voters who need to be brought on board, and I think the goal of the convention is for it to be this kumbaya moment for the Democrats and to show they are a party that's unified versus the Republicans as a party that's not," said Kyle Kondik, an expert at UVA’s Center for Politics.

more >
Washington Post

(By Boris Heersink, a Ph.D. candidate, and Sidney M. Milkis, White Burkett Miller Professor, both in UVA’s politics department) The Republican National Convention this week has received mostly negative reviews from reporters and pundits.

more >
New York Post

Chaos reigned Sunday ahead of the Democratic National Convention, as the party’s head was forced to quit, thousands of protesters took to the streets and delegates threatened a walk-out over Hillary Clinton’s vice-presidential pick. UVA political scientist Larry Sabato said that “unless the Clinton campaign has an agreement with the Sanders bunch to let her leave gracefully, it could be a mistake” to let Wasserman Schultz take the podium.

more >
Daily Press

Virginia is critical for both Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump. Without Virginia, most political analysts say it would be impossible for Trump to win enough Electoral College votes to win the White House. UVA political scientist Larry Sabato said he was changing his rating for Virginia from leaning Democratic to likely to vote Democratic in November.

more >
NJ.com

All eyes will be on Clinton to see if she can create momentum. "Ideally, she would be able to improve her high unfavorable ratings," said Larry Sabato, a UVA political science professor. "That's tough, but maybe they have some tricks up the sleeve."

more >
USA TODAY

We're way past trying to figure out which candidate is most likable. Now we're just figuring out which candidate makes us want to tap our brakes if we saw them in a crosswalk. “People want to know that the next four years is not going to be a dumpster fire,” said Larry Sabato, a UVA politics expert. Low bar: set.

more >
Live Science

Once they get a taste, little kids may obsess about any given thing, such as Thomas the Tank Engine, dinosaurs or princesses. "In some cases, [an intense interest] is just enjoyable. It's [just] something they like," said Judy DeLoache, a UVA professor of psychology. "It's perfectly normal. There isn't anything weird about it."

more >
Virginian-Pilot

Head football coach Bronco Mendenhall blew into Charlottesville with his own vernacular, talking of creating a culture of “earned, not given” and of building “will before skill.” He said he’s been surprised by how quickly his team has increased its “work capacity” and embraced his way of doing things.

more >
3ders.org (blog)

Dr. Jose Gurrola II, a doctor at the UVA Health System, has been using 3-D-printed skulls at his otolaryngology clinic to teach students how to perform a nasal endoscopy: inserting a camera with a long scope down a patient’s nasal cavity.

more >
WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

Virginia Democrats are reacting with great enthusiasm on the Internet. "For Virginia, it takes Virginia off the swing state map. I can't imagine even Republicans other than the Trump backers would suggest that Virginia would still be competitive this year," said Larry Sabato of UVA’s Center for Politics.

more >
NBCNews.com

Heading into the convention, Trump's favorability numbers made him the most unpopular presumptive presidential nominee in the history of the NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll. While there have been highly polarized party conventions before, this one is definitely much worse than usual, according to Larry Sabato, director of UVA’s Center for Politics.

more >
Washington Post

Leah Smith popped her head above the water, glanced up and started mouthing, “Oh my God.” She had just swam the final of the 400-meter freestyle at the U.S. Olympic trials in Omaha.

more >
Washington Post

(By Larry Sabato, director of UVA’s Center for Politics) Vice-presidential candidates can be divided into two categories: political choices selected for what they can deliver on Election Day and governing picks who can do some heavy lifting in the White House. By choosing Tim Kaine, Hillary Clinton will get both.

more >
Chronicle of Higher Education

Schools and colleges spend billions of tuition and tax dollars on digital teaching tools and other educational-technology products, yet they rarely demand rigorous evidence that those products are effective. "It’s a circle of gridlock," says Bart Epstein, chief executive of Jefferson Education at the University of Virginia, which has begun a project aimed at cutting through the excuses and breaking open that logjam.

more >
3DPrint.com

Along with otolaryngology resident Dr. Robert Reed and design lab engineer Dwight Dart of the UVA School of Engineering and Applied Science’s Rapid Prototyping Lab, Dr. Gurrola has created 3D printed skulls that allow procedures such as endoscopy to be practiced and perfected before residents ever have to perform them on a patient.

more >