American Medical Association (blog)

As long as the technology makes care more efficient for patients and is easy to use in clinical practice, physicians are willing to adopt. At the UVA Health System, stroke victims who lived in the rural areas that the health system serves were at greater risk of brain damage and disability.

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Washington Post

Then came John F. Kennedy and a generational change. In his inaugural address, he offered a chilling vision of a nation and a civilization on the eve of destruction. Nuclear holocaust now seemed a plausible fate. His point, says Larry Sabato, director of UVA’s Center for Politics, was that he would be just as tough on communism as any Republican.

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sciencefocus.com

A penny dropped from the top of the Eiffel Tower could kill someone: The building used as the basis of this myth varies. Much more constant is the terminal velocity of a penny, which is around 44 km/h (27 mph). The penny reaches that speed after it has been falling for about 15 meters. Once the penny has reached its terminal velocity, it will not accelerate any further. UVA physicist Louis Bloomfield used this calculation to replicate the fall of pennies from tall buildings. He found that pennies at that speed would not break the skin – at most, they would just sting a little.

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WIRED

Scientists today are exploring more promising new technologies than ever before. But that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re more promising. No number of flashy new disruptors can fix cancer research’s real problem: much of its data can’t be trusted, because it was never validated. Brian Nosek saw this as a challenge. A UVA psychologist, Nosek founded the Center for Open Science in 2011 to investigate the reproducibility of canonical psychology studies.

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UPI.com

Research has found that the Affordable Care Act increased the accessibility and affordability of recommended cancer screenings for millions of Americans. UVA researchers examined how the ACA, commonly known as Obamacare, impacted early cancer diagnoses in breast and colorectal cancers.

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Washington Post

Even as the scientific community fights against pseudoscience, climate change denial, the anti-vaccine movement and other forms of suspicion and superstition, it has an internal, nagging conundrum: Important experiments often can't be replicated. The Center for Open Science's founder, UVA psychology professor Brian Nosek, said there are many possible explanations for why those second attempts failed to come up with identical results.

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NPR’s Morning Edition

Brian Nosek, who spearheaded this research of work from cancer biology labs at the Center for Open Science, is also a psychology professor at the University of Virginia. A few years ago, he organized a similar effort to examine research in his field. And his results garnered worldwide attention when two-thirds of the original findings in psychology couldn't be reproduced.

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Washington Times

Roughly 60 House Democrats, or nearly one-third of the 194-member caucus, plan to be elsewhere when Trump takes the oath of office, citing objections from Russian hacking to his feud with Rep. John Lewis of Georgia. “It seems fairly unprecedented this number of people would boycott and in such a formalized manner,” said Barbara Perry, presidential studies director of UVA’s Miller Center of Public Affairs.

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Wall Street Journal

“Companies themselves know that the transition may take months, and if they want a prompt settlement to put a major case behind them, they should do so now,” said Brandon Garrett, a UVA law professor who studies white-collar crime. “They may also be worried about the policies of the new administration. Companies want certainty, not disruption.”

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Washington Post

The University of Virginia will open its gates a bit wider to in-state students in the next school year and offer some middle-class families a new tuition break worth $2,000 a year.

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Charlottesville Daily Progress

(Commentary by Bob Gibson, senior researcher at the Academy for Civic Renewal in UVA’s Cooper Center for Public Service) Virginia’s population is still growing, but not as fast as in recent decades, according to population trends examined by the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service.

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C-VILLE Weekly

UVA professor and writer Sydney Blair was generous with her time. She was an integral part of UVA’s MFA program, first as an administrator and then as an associate professor, since her own graduation from the program in 1986.

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Inside Higher Ed

The University of Virginia announced Tuesday that it will add 100 undergraduate slots for Virginians. The university also announced new grants of $2,000 for Virginians from families with incomes of less than $125,000 who do not receive grants or scholarships from other sources.

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Time

As the 44th President of the United States prepares to leave office, 10 experts – including Barbara A. Perry, director of presidential studies and co-chair of the presidential oral history program at UVA’s Miller Center – imagine how future historians will judge his legacy.

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Time

Exactly how President Obama’s legacy will be assessed is a complicated question. One person who has spent time figuring out how to answer that question is Barbara A. Perry, director of presidential studies and co-chair of the presidential oral history program at UVA’s Miller Center.

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MSUToday

Once upon a time, it was thought that crop diseases affected only crops. New research shows, however, that a common wheat virus can spread and harm perennial native grasses. In the current issue of the Journal of Ecology, researchers from Michigan State University, the University of Kansas and the University of Virginia show that farmers and scientists need to think about how best to protect native plants from diseases emanating from crops.

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Forbes

(By Ed Hess, professor of business administration and Batten Executive-in-Residence at UVA’s Darden School of Business) Many business leaders tell me that one of their top priorities is increasing the quality and speed of their organizational innovation. Faster and better is now being applied to innovation just as it has been applied for decades to operational excellence.

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CBC.ca

For presidents who left the office in disgrace, a transition into private life can have a rehabilitative effect, says Nicole Hemmer, an expert on presidential studies who lectures at UVA’s Miller Center of Public Affairs. Carter was a one-term president "who also left on a sour note," Hemmer says, but "was able to reinvent his career as an advocate for human and civil rights," becoming a beloved figure among Democrats.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

The UVA Board of Visitors is taking strides to make college more affordable for students from middle-income households. Tuesday, the board announced the Cornerstone Grants as part of a multi-year strategy to enhance access and affordability for in-state students.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

UVA students are offering free summer camp to children affected by a parent with cancer. Children aged 6 through 18 can apply to attend the weeklong Camp Kesem in August. It's run entirely by undergraduate students from UVA.

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