Associated Press

UVA researcher Noelle Hurd has focused on mentorship effects within black adolescents. She found the best benefits happen when there is a "close relationship bond." "It's about someone who understands you," Hurd said.

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Staunton News Leader

The earlier students can be exposed to the realities of the field, the better, said Dr. Siobhan Statuta, director of the UVA Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship and team physician with UVA Sports Medicine. Education is expensive, and the job is challenging, but it's also rewarding, she said.

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The Straits Times

Gaining excessive weight during pregnancy has been linked to a higher risk of macrosomic babies, those who are significantly larger than average. Macrosomic babies are more likely to become obese by the time they reach kindergarten, according to a 2017 study by researchers from the UVA School of Medicine.

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New York Times

(Commentary) Selling us out is, after all, just another kind of selling. No matter how they dress things up with rosy language, their real goal is making themselves, and their angel investors and venture capitalists, obscenely rich. To beat the companies now dominating the market, I realized I’d have to understand them better. So I called Siva Vaidhyanathan, the director of UVA’s Center for Media and Citizenship.

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The Conversation

(Commentary by Cale Jaffe, assistant professor of law and director of UVA’s Environmental and Regulatory Law Clinic) The Supreme Court will decide in 2019 whether a Virginia law that bans uranium mining is preempted by the Atomic Energy Act, the U.S. law governing the processing and enrichment of nuclear material.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

A treatment studied at the University of Virginia Health System is replacing scalpels with sound waves in hopes of helping patients with Parkinson’s disease.

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Toronto Globe and Mail

Two Canadians working in the U.S., UVA professor Gillian Frank and Jamie Duong, challenged Canadian voting restrictions after being unable to vote in the federal election of 2011. At the time, the law said non-resident citizens could not vote if they had lived more than five years abroad.

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New York Times

Every other year, tens of thousands of the state’s public school students complete online surveys about their schools’ social environment. They’re asked a number of questions about bullying, including teasing over race and ethnicity, sexual orientation and other sexual issues. Because surveys of middle schoolers are done in odd years, researchers had data for seventh and eighth graders from both 2015, right before the election, and 2017, right after it. Over 400 middle schools participated.

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Smart Energy International

UVA has been announced as the 2019 innovation award winner in the 'Higher Education Energy Efficiency Technology' category. The award honors the University's Delta Force initiative, in which the institution identifies internal energy savings potentials, funds them and recovers 125 percent of the funding out of utility savings.

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Ladders

Reject the lesser candidate. Confront the lazy employee. Give critical feedback on that project right away. Your office will be happier for it. That’s advice from a recent study published in the journal “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin” which found that feeling ignored or unacknowledged is worse for a person’s mental health than receiving bad news. “Ostracism is more powerful than we think,” says study co-author Andrew H. Hales, a UVA postdoctoral researcher.

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Cardus

(Commentary by Chad Wellmon, associate professor of German studies) Before he philosophized with a hammer, Friedrich Nietzsche counted Greek metre. In 1868, the University of Basel appointed, or “called” as German academics put it to this day, the 24-year-old Leipzig student a professor in ancient Greek language and literature. For several years, Nietzsche played the professional philologist, publishing erudite articles, arguing with fellow scholars over minutiae, and introducing students to the discipline of philology. By 1875, he had had enough.

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Newsweek

A Virginia study launched in response to reports of a surge in bullying at schools across the country following the 2016 presidential election has found a rise in abuse in areas of the state that voted for President Donald Trump, compared to those that supported his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton.

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NPR

After the 2016 presidential election, teachers across the country reported they were seeing increased name-calling and bullying in their classrooms. Now, research shows that those stories — at least in one state — are confirmed by student surveys. Francis Huang of the University of Missouri and Dewey Cornell of the University of Virginia used data from a school climate survey taken by over 150,000 students across Virginia. They looked at student responses to questions about bullying and teasing from 2015 and 2017.

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Constitution Daily

What would happen if the president decided to declare a national emergency and divert military funds to build the wall? What statutes could he rely on? And would such an action be constitutional? Host Jeffrey Rosen and guests Mark Tushnet of Harvard Law and Sai Prakash of UVA Law explore the constitutional clauses, cases, and laws at issue in this hotly contested debate.  

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Lynchburg News & Daily Advance

On Jan. 2, the last day of the 115th Congress — and the last day the Ethics Committee would have jurisdiction over Garrett — the panel released what would be its one and only report of its findings in its investigation. Larry Sabato, of UVA’s Center for Politics, said the move was an extraordinary one for the committee and could only mean the members were troubled enough by their findings to want some sort of accounting released to the public and to Congress.

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Charlottesville Daily Progress

While former Rep. Tom Garrett, R-5th, intended to amend his bill honoring Army Capt. Humayun Khan with the renaming of a post office in Charlottesville, the version that was signed by the president instead renames a contract postal unit. Now, Virginia’s U.S. senators are working to correct the situation. HR 3184, signed by President Donald Trump on Dec. 23, designates the McCormick Road site near the University of Virginia as the “Captain Humayun Khan Post Office,” honoring the only UVA graduate to be killed in action during the Iraq War.

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The Washington Post

The research, conducted by professors at the University of Missouri and the University of Virginia and published online Wednesday in a peer-reviewed journal, does not blame Trump specifically for the rise. Co-author Dewey Cornell, an education professor at the University of Virginia, said in a statement: "While the ways in which the presidential election could have affected students is likely complex, educators and parents should be aware of the potential impact of public events on student behavior.

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Voice of America

Donald Trump fueled his rise to the presidency with a campaign promise to build a border wall. He is now under pressure from conservatives to follow through, according to UVA analyst Larry Sabato. "Essentially, they said, 'If you don't push harder for your wall and you don't get billions of dollars to build it, then your base, and we represent that base, won't be there for you in 2020,'" he said.

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Chalkbeat Colorado

“We found differences in teasing and bullying rates that were linked to voting preferences, which we didn’t see prior to the 2016 presidential election,” said Francis Huang, an associate professor at the University of Missouri, who conducted the study with UVA professor Dewey Cornell. Huang and Cornell examined the survey responses of more than 155,000 seventh- and eighth-grade students across Virginia’s 132 school districts.

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The Independent (U.K.)

Dewey Cornell, a UVA professor of education and co-author of the study, warned: “Parents should be mindful of how their reactions to the presidential election, or the reactions of others, could influence their children. And politicians should be mindful of the potential impact of their campaign rhetoric and behavior on their supporters and indirectly on youth."

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