Dr. Javier Provencio is on the trail of a 70-year-old medical mystery. He and colleagues at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have made strides in finding the culprit behind a type of delayed cognitive deterioration that plagues brain aneurysm survivors.

An associate professor of medicine and director of UVA’s Nerancy Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit, Provencio focuses his research on a phenomenon known as cerebral vasospasm, also called delayed deterioration. This is a condition that affects nearly 30 percent of people who suffer and survive an aneurysm rupture.

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Years after his 2011 retirement, Leonard W. Sandridge remains one of the most respected administrators ever to serve at the University of Virginia. The former executive vice president and chief operating officer and his wife, Jerry, became integral parts of the UVA community in the 44 years he worked on Grounds.

This spring, in recognition of the Sandridges’ years of dedication to UVA, professor Larry J. Sabato, founder and director of the UVA Center for Politics, has donated $100,000 to the University to launch the Leonard and Jerry Sandridge Bicentennial Scholars Fund.

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Researchers have found that a hormone responsible for controlling iron metabolism helps fight off a severe form of bacterial pneumonia, and that discovery may offer a simple way to help vulnerable patients.

The researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have identified a key hormone critical for preventing pneumonia bacteria from spreading throughout the body. The hormone, hepcidin, is produced in the liver and limits the spread of the bacteria by hiding the iron in the blood that the bacteria need to survive and grow.

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Bryan Cranston took the stage at the University of Virginia’s John Paul Jones Arena on Sunday to raucous applause from thousands of students, faculty and community members, looking as happy to see the audience as they were to see him.

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Even teachers have to go back to school, and they love going to the classes offered by the University of Virginia’s Center for Liberal Arts.

The center has provided workshops with enriching content to Virginia kindergarten-through-12th-grade teachers for more than 30 years and will now take its lauded program on the road to other universities, reaching more teachers.

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“First Light.”

That is the term astronomers use to describe the first time starlight enters a new telescope or other astronomical instrument. It essentially means “all is well” (though perhaps with a little more tweaking by its designers), and the instrument can begin making meaningful scientific observations.

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The National Institute of Justice says two-thirds of released inmates will be rearrested within three years. A new University of Virginia program is aiming to change that.

Two UVA professors, in partnership with Edovo, a Chicago-based education technology firm, are launching a program that will develop, implement and evaluate a tablet-based re-entry module to strengthen inmates’ transitions back into society after they complete their sentences.

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Bryan Cranston first decided to be an actor just a few miles away from the University of Virginia, on the beautiful Blue Ridge Parkway.

Four decades later, Cranston – now 61 and an award-winning actor best known for playing drug kingpin Walter White in the hit TV series “Breaking Bad” – will return to Virginia and take the stage Sunday at John Paul Jones Arena for the annual UVA President’s Speaker Series for the Arts. Along with “Breaking Bad” producer and UVA alumnus Mark Johnson, Cranston will discuss his career and the impact of the arts.

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On Oct. 6, 1817, three U.S. presidents – Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and James Monroe – gathered for the laying of the cornerstone of the first building of the University of Virginia.

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The University of Virginia School of Medicine has again shown that a part of the body thought to be disconnected from the immune system actually interacts with it, and that discovery helps explain cases of male infertility, certain autoimmune diseases and even the failure of cancer vaccines.

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Populations of the rusty patched bumblebee, a once-common bee species, have dramatically declined during the past three decades. Many scientists who study bees believe the species may be headed toward extinction.

On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of the Interior officially listed the rusty patched bumblebee under the Endangered Species Act – the first bee species in the continental United States to be so listed. The listing will help protect the species from activities that may harm the bee and its habitat.

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Jim Donovan, an adjunct professor at the University of Virginia School of Law and a managing director of Goldman Sachs, has been nominated to fill the post of deputy secretary of the U.S. Treasury Department.

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A new crop of Cavaliers is setting the internet ablaze this week. They began sharing their excitement from all corners of the globe as soon as the University of Virginia released its regular admission decisions on Wednesday evening.    

Those who were offered a space in the Class of 2021 underwent one of the most competitive admission years in UVA history amid a record number of applicants. Nearly 36,800 students applied to the University in 2017, a more than 13 percent increase over the total in 2016.

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In an alternative universe somewhere, the University of Virginia has a chapel on the Lawn. Memorial Gymnasium is over on Mad Bowl. Physics students take classes in a striking, modernist building that almost seems to float. This version of Grounds has a 12-story dorm on North Grounds near the Law School.

And there’s no Rotunda.

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Gary McGraw describes himself as an “alpha geek.”

The information technology expert got his first computer, an Apple, in 1981 at the age of 15. Four years later, he got on the public “net” when few in the public had even heard of the Internet. He also wrote the 10th chapter of the first book ever sold on Amazon (“Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies: Computer Models of the Fundamental Mechanisms of Thought”). And he’s also a multi-instrument musician who twice played his violin at Carnegie Hall.

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A large crowd gathered on Friday to celebrate the opening of the latest hotspot to grace Charlottesville’s famous Corner district: the University of Virginia’s new state-of-the-art student center.

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Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine are hoping that the power of the Internet – and compelling personal experiences – will help reach people with HIV who are neglecting their health because of fear, stigma or substance abuse.

The researchers are testing an online program they have developed to address the most common problems they see among people who are failing to take their HIV medications. In some cases, they say, people won’t even fill their prescriptions because they don’t want anyone to know about their diagnosis – even their pharmacist.

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As “big data” plays a growing role in business decisions around the world, graduates who combine solid business strategy with an in-depth knowledge of computer science, statistics and analytics will be uniquely positioned to make an impact.

That’s the premise of a new University of Virginia dual-degree program announced Monday, a joint venture from its Darden School of Business and its Data Science Institute.

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John Norton Moore is a towering figure in the realms of national security and oceans policy; his work has explored the boundaries of war and pathways to peace and influenced generations of legal scholars and professionals over 50 years of teaching at the University of Virginia School of Law.

Having taken academic leave a half-dozen times in his career to serve in key government posts, Moore launched the U.S. Institute of Peace, led law-of-the-sea talks and was involved in drawing new boundaries for Kuwait following the first Gulf War.

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With hearings slated to begin Monday on President Trump’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court, journalists and researchers have been scrambling to put together a comprehensive dossier on the candidate.

In response, the library at the University of Virginia School of Law, in collaboration with other law libraries and interested groups, has created the Neil Gorsuch Project, a one-stop website that compiles the judge’s opinions, publications and speeches.

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