On the night before he was to compete at the Atlantic Coast Conference Outdoor Track and Field Championships in May 2016, Jeff Jernigan sat down at a table in a Tallahassee, Florida, hotel and took a final exam in astronautics.

It occurred to Jernigan, then a third-year student at the University of Virginia, that he was probably the only pole vaulter in the ACC taking on such an intellectual challenge that evening.

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Matt Shields’ path to becoming a teacher was not quite traditional.

A Virginia native, Shields attended the University of Virginia to earn both bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical and aerospace engineering, in 1998 and 2001, respectively. But after working as an engineer, then a web developer, he realized his true calling: education.

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A section of the “Long Walk,” an historic pedestrian walkway running from the Rotunda to the Corner, is being unearthed and repaved.

The corridor dates from the founding of the University of Virginia, and is still in use. At various times, it has been a dirt pathway, a concrete thoroughfare and a brick walkway. Parts of all these versions are still there, stacked one on top of the other, workers recently discovered.

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The University of Virginia continues to expand its portfolio of carbon-free power-generation sources and achieve key sustainability targets with another partnership announced today with Dominion Energy.

Under a 25-year agreement, the University will purchase the entire output of a proposed 120-acre solar facility in Middlesex County. The solar facility, developed by Coronal Energy, will be constructed and owned by Dominion Energy. It will produce an estimated 15 megawatts of alternating current, or about 9 percent of the University’s electric demand.

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Nearly two years ago, the University of Virginia founded a public benefit company – “public benefit” being a key objective – to provide an affordable way for families in infrastructure-challenged countries to purify drinking water. Today that company, MadiDrop PBC – which uses an elegantly simple technology – has shipped more than 20,000 ceramic purification tablets to humanitarian organizations in several countries, primarily in Africa and Latin America.

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As Virginians embrace the height of summer with trips into the Blue Ridge Mountains and afternoons spent on trails, most know to check their skin for pesky hangers-on at the end of the day. Peak outdoors season also means peak tick season in this neck of woods.

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A new book penned by two University of Virginia law students details the history of the University’s Jefferson Literary and Debating Society, the oldest student organization on Grounds, of which Edgar Allan Poe and Woodrow Wilson were members.

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It’s like the Superman of viruses, astonishingly tough and able to survive in an environment that would dissolve flesh and bone. And now scientists have unlocked the secrets of its indestructibility, potentially allowing them to harness its remarkable properties to create super-durable materials and to better treat disease.

The discovery reveals something never before seen in the natural world. Potential uses include everything from pinpoint delivery of cancer drugs so they only attack tumors to building materials that could better withstand an earthquake’s tremors.

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As University of Virginia alumna Lindsay Hinz walked the streets of Brooklyn in a wedding dress, strangers congratulated her on her marriage and told her how beautiful her dress was.

They were right about one thing – it was a beautiful dress – but those kind strangers were missing a few key facts.

Hinz didn’t get married. And her dress? It was made entirely of toilet paper.

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As the University of Virginia’s bicentennial approaches, UVA Today is releasing a series of quizzes to help readers brush up on 200 years worth of Wahoo trivia. We began in April with a quiz on general UVA history; now we’re asking readers to show us what they know about some of the school’s alumni.

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A few months into his second deployment in Afghanistan in 2015 – which interrupted his studies at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business – U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Michael Sargent found himself trapped by Taliban insurgents in a dark, muddy compound in the country’s tumultuous Helmand province.

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Some undergraduate students conducted hands-on research in astronomy, discovering a new molecule in space. Others are developing software to test the structural integrity of bridges and roads or to advance health information technology. Still others have studied the fluid mechanics of dolphin and whale movement, or experimented with synthetic materials for wound healing.

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Aggressive combination treatments for high blood pressure that are intended to protect the kidneys may actually damage the organs, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests.

Researchers identified the potential problem while studying strange kidney lesions in mice that cannot make the enzyme renin; similar lesions are also seen in human patients with high blood pressure. The researchers determined the lesions are the work of renin cells, which are sometimes targeted in treating high blood pressure.

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We live in a world of divisions – between black and white, police and citizens, Republicans and Democrats. As the heated rhetoric between opposing sides grows louder, often the response from those seeking peace is, “If only we could just sit down and talk.”

It’s a beautiful idea, that the world’s problems could be solved over coffee. But has it ever really worked?

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Phillip A. Parrish, interim vice president for research at the University of Virginia, died unexpectedly Wednesday evening. Parrish played a key role in the development of three new University-wide research institutes – the UVA Brain Institute, the Environmental Resilience Institute and the Global Infectious Diseases Institute – all part of a major initiative to distinguish the University through trans-disciplinary research and scholarship addressing areas of critical global societal need.

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The question of how to stem the nation’s opioid epidemic now has a major detailed response.  A new study chaired by University of Virginia School of Law Professor Richard Bonnie provides extensive recommendations for curbing the problem.

Drug overdoses are the leading cause of unintentional death in the United States, and opioids are the chief contributor. Between 2011 and 2015, overdose deaths from illicit opioids increased from 7,019 to 19,884 — almost threefold.

Bonnie chaired the study for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

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MONEY Magazine continues to give high marks to the University of Virginia, selecting it again as a top value among public and private institutions in the country.

In its 2017 “Best Colleges for Your Money” rankings, the magazine determines UVA is the best value among Virginia public and private institutions and the top university overall in the South, while placing the University at No. 7 among public institutions nationally.

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