In the midst of a global pandemic, historic and controversial events related to race and inequality, divisive elections, and deepening polarization, it would be an understatement to say that democracy faces significant challenges.

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Today the University of Virginia opened a new chapter in its strategic expansion in one of the most dynamic regions in the country. 

UVA|NOVA will be UVA’s campus in Northern Virginia, beginning with a site in the Rosslyn neighborhood of North Arlington and ultimately expanding to other sites in the region. The campus will build upon, and bring together, existing programs and serve as a platform for significantly expanding offerings – including in-person, online and hybrid instruction – targeting those who are interested in advancing in their careers. 

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Avery Walters, a third-year civil engineering student at the University of Virginia, has designed a passively cooled Cambodian farm school, a rapidly deployable shelter for displaced people, created 3-D models of Soviet spacecraft and is now working on a smart HVAC control system that manages indoor air quality and energy consumption as his capstone project.

He can add a John Mather Nobel Scholarship to his list of accomplishments.

Walters, whose studies focus on civil engineering with a concentration on environmental and water resources, will use the funds to network.

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Recent college graduates, members of the Virginia College Advising Corps, have spread out across Virginia to advise high school students.

Members of the corps, encompassing recent graduates of the University of Virginia, UVA’s College at Wise and several other schools, will spend the next year guiding high school students toward higher education.

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A new discovery about osteoporosis suggests a potential treatment target for that brittle-bone disease and for bone loss from rheumatoid arthritis.

The findings from University of Virginia School of Medicine researchers and their collaborators help explain why specialized bone cells, called “osteoclasts,” begin to break down more bone than the body replaces. With more research, scientists one day may be able to target that underlying cause to prevent or treat bone loss.

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After a hectic election year in 2020, the University of Virginia Center for Politics and the staff of Sabato’s Crystal Ball, the center’s political analysis newsletter edited by professor Larry J. Sabato, aren’t slowing down. Instead, they recently chose to take on one of the most fraught topics in American politics: redistricting.

Kyle Kondik, managing editor of Sabato’s Crystal Ball, along with Crystal Ball Associate Editor J. Miles Coleman recently published a multi-part series on the subject.

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A summer surge in U.S. COVID-19 cases, fueled by the delta variant, has begun to wane, although many health systems remain heavily strained. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, one in three U.S. hospitals with intensive care units recently reported that at least 95% of their intensive care unit beds were full. 

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Promising news in the effort to develop drugs to treat obesity comes from University of Virginia scientists who have identified 14 genes that can cause weight gain and three that can prevent it. The findings pave the way for treatments to combat a health problem that affects more than 40% of American adults.

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University of Virginia professors Micah Mazurek and Dr. Beth Ellen Davis have spent their careers working to improve the health and well-being of children with disabilities. Both Davis’ and Mazurek’s long-standing commitment to this work is, in part, an outgrowth of their serving as fellows and, ultimately, leaders in the national Leadership Education in Neurodevelopment & Related Disabilities, or LEND, program.

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Being small is good. Being very small is better. That is the philosophy of Mark Kester, University of Virginia professor of biomedical engineering, pharmacology and molecular physiology and biophysics. 

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This month, the U.S. National Science Foundation announced that researchers in the University of Virginia’s Department of Environmental Sciences, along with researchers from 11 other universities and research institutes, will take a leadership role in The Center for Chemical Currencies of a Microbial Planet, or C-CoMP, a virtual center coordinated through an administrative hub based at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts.

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When Drew Sanderford was a student at the University of Virginia, he was, like many undergraduates, uncertain of exactly what he was interested in and what his future career path would look like.

So whether Sanderford – who would go on to spend a portion of his professional career in the real estate field – would have specifically wanted to study real estate back then is not certain.

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The statistics vary from year to year, but a failure rate of 60% for candidates is not unusual at the U.S. Army’s Ranger School.

Second Lieutenant Sam Martino, a former University of Virginia wrestler, is among the soldiers who passed the grueling 62-day course and earned a Ranger tab this summer.

“I don’t pretend to know how hard it was, but just some of the things I’ve heard and read, it’s crazy what they go through,” UVA head wrestling coach Steve Garland said. “What that young man was able to endure and persevere through, that’s just incredible to me.”

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Artificial intelligence-inspired policing technology and techniques like facial recognition software and digital surveillance continue to find traction and champions among law enforcement agencies, but at what cost to the public?

Some cities like Wilmington, North Carolina, have even adopted AI-driven policing, where technology like ShotSpotter identifies gunshots and their locations. The software also recommends to patrol officers “next best action” based on their current location, police data on past crime records, time of day, and housing and population density.

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Tax breaks for charitable giving should be expanded, not eliminated, to encourage community engagement among all income levels, says University of Virginia School of Law professor Andrew Hayashi.

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With the fall academic semester in full swing, University of Virginia medical experts shared an update on issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic with the University community on Wednesday.

The message addressed questions regarding prevalence testing, vaccination rates, safe gatherings and the likelihood that UVA might either tighten or relax its guidance and practices in the months ahead.

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Many U.S. schools, businesses and governments requiring COVID-19 vaccination have offered religious exemptions. But what are they, exactly, and is the government even required to offer the exemptions in the first place?

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Just who is Dr. Melina Kibbe? A clinician and researcher? An educator? Sci-fi nerd? The answer is “all of the above” and more. This week, she adds three more titles to her accomplished career: dean of the University of Virginia School of Medicine, James Carroll Flippin Professor of Medical Science, and chief health affairs officer for UVA Health.

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The Virginia Film Festival announced Tuesday that it will be returning for its 34th year with a program of in-theater and drive-in presentations from Oct. 27-31. Festival officials also announced that this year’s lineup will include an episode of the highly anticipated Hulu limited series “Dopesick,” presented in partnership with the Virginia Festival of the Book. The screening, which will be held at the Paramount Theater, will be followed by a conversation with writer and executive producer Danny Strong.

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When Chris Obolensky arrived at the University of Virginia three years ago, he was surprised to learn that that there was no place on Grounds that focused specifically on helping students hone their public speaking skills.

Sure, there were some public speaking courses that one could take, but there was nothing that could provide immediate support for tasks such as classroom presentations or even just everyday social interactions.

Obolensky, now a fourth-year student, decided to take matters into his own hands.

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