Washington Free Beacon

Everytown has largely avoided Second Amendment issues when trying to woo voters in swing states. The group minimized gun control in attack ads aimed at Republican senators running for reelection in Iowa and North Carolina earlier this month. The decision indicates Everytown has determined issues like health care and energy production are more persuasive to swing-state voters – many of whom may have recently become gun owners – according to J. Miles Coleman, associate editor of Sabato's Crystal Ball at UVA’s Center for Politics.

Wisconsin State Journal

Polling experts interviewed by the Wisconsin State Journal said that while Biden is the favorite to win as of today, people should still view current polling with caution. “We all ought to be wary this year,” said Larry Sabato, founder and director of UVA’s Center for Politics and Sabato’s Crystal Ball. “It’s not PTSD, it is appropriate caution. We need to remember how flawed these instruments can be under the right set of circumstances. What are those circumstances? You never know in advance.”

WSLS-NBC-10 (Roanoke/Lynchburg)

UVA researchers are working with a lab at Virginia Tech to find a vaccine for COVID-19. But even if one is approved, its success depends on how many people agree to take it.

Charlottesville Daily Progress

The University of Virginia athletics department revealed its COVID-19 testing results from Sept. 21-27 on Monday, announcing that it had administered 1,168 tests with 22 positive test results.

ABC News

A tale of two campaigns is emerging ahead of the first face-to-face meeting in the general election between President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden Tuesday night on the presidential debate stage. All told, Biden has participated in 26 vice presidential and presidential primary debates in the 33 years since he launched his first presidential run in 1987, according to a list of debates compiled by UVA’s Center for Politics.

Charlottesville Daily Progress

An inflammation syndrome in some children exposed to COVID-19 may serve as a warning to researchers working on a virus vaccine to keep safety in mind, a UVA researcher and his colleagues say.

USA Today

Democrats say the new justice could shift the court’s balance to 6-3 in favor of conservatives and lead to the overturning of the Roe v. Wade abortion ruling, the ending of the Affordable Care Act, and restriction of LGBTQ rights. “The court plays an outsize role in constitutional law,” says Saikrishna Prakash, the James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law at the UVA School of Law. “These nine people decide what our Constitution means.”

MSN News

Barbara Perry of the University of Virginia says issues such as reproductive rights, police reform and the Affordable Care Act may slide toward the conservative side if Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed as judge on the U.S. Supreme Court. She also expects the U.S. election to lean towards President Trump's favor if Barrett is appointed.

WVTF Public Radio/Radio IQ (Roanoke)

The COVID pandemic has prompted more doctors and nurses to see their patients online, but more than 300,000 rural residents of this state lack high-speed internet. Recent budget cuts in Richmond will delay the expansion of broadband, but a UVA team is proposing another way to make telemedicine available.

PoliticKing

(Video) Larry Sabato, director of the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics, discusses with Larry King the impact of Donald Trump’s taped conversations with journalist Bob Woodward on the presidential race.

Insider Higher Ed

UVA researchers compared course completion rates for students at the Virginia Community College System who were enrolled in online courses from the start of the spring semester against those who were enrolled in in-person courses at the start and had to switch to virtual instruction due to the pandemic. They found that the shift to virtual instruction resulted in a 6.7-percentage-point decrease in course completion. 

Dogwood

This summer has been a season of tests or lack thereof. In between checking for COVID-19, many high school seniors also experienced a test of their patience. With no in-person classes, they couldn’t take the SAT or ACT tests. As a result, college admission offices across the country changed course to accommodate a lack of standardized college admission testing. That includes colleges in Virginia, as they went “test-optional or “test blind” due to a shortage of testing availability.

Dogwood

This summer has been a season of tests or lack thereof. In between checking for COVID-19, many high school seniors also experienced a test of their patience. With no in-person classes, they couldn’t take the SAT or ACT tests. As a result, college admission offices across the country changed course to accommodate a lack of standardized college admission testing. That includes colleges in Virginia, as they went “test-optional or “test blind” due to a shortage of testing availability.

Chief Investment Officer

The University of Virginia (UVA) endowment’s long-term pool returned 5.3% for the fiscal year ending June 30, outperforming its benchmark portfolio’s return of 3.3%. The gains increased the endowment’s total asset value to $9.9 billion from $9.6 billion last year.

International Business Times (India)

As the novel coronavirus vaccine would be approved in the U.S. by Food and Drug Administration before the end of 2020, University of Virginia researcher Dr. Steven Zeichner said that the vaccine would not be effective at all if a certain number of people don’t get the shot.

National Cybersecurity News

The DOJ’s proposal targets the second type of immunity as well. It would effectively open platforms to legal action if they take down posts simply because they find them objectionable. “That is basically telling a private company it could face all kinds of crackdowns if it doesn’t participate in certain kinds of speech,” said Siva Vaidhyanathan, professor of media studies at University of Virginia.

The American Spectator

(Commentary) Nor is there any rational basis for the claim that Trump is violating historical precedent by nominating Ginsburg’s successor so near the end of his first term with no assurance that he will be reelected. University of Virginia professor Barbara A. Perry has pointed out in the Washington Post, six lame duck presidents (Harrison, Hayes, Tyler, Van Buren, Jackson, and Adams) nominated justices shortly before leaving office.

What Doctors Don’t Tell You

UVA researchers recruited 155 healthy adults either into a psychological wellbeing course or put them on a wait list. Three months after the course ended, those who had participated reported fewer sick days than those who had stayed on the wait list. They also said they felt better, mentally and physically.

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

Kimberly J. Robinson, a professor of law at the University of Virginia, said the outcome was “horrific” but it could be a transformative moment for the future of the Black Lives Matter movement. “I think the risk with the Black Lives Matter movement is that it could dwindle out without requiring the systemic reforms of education and other areas that are needed,” Robinson said. “This moment will be one that people will point to as something that continues to fuel the need to move forward.”

Indianapolis Star

(Commentary by Jeff Bergner, adjunct professor in UVA’s Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy) In the midst of all the vitriol over replacing Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the U.S. Supreme Court, perhaps a few facts could help to anchor the conversation.