The Atlantic

While women often mistake males’ indications of sexual interest for expressions of friendliness, men consistently mistake females’ expressions of friendliness for sexual interest. This might help explain why men are more likely to report attraction toward opposite-sex friends than are women.Further complicating matters, UVA and Harvard researchers found that women were most attracted to men whose level of interest in them was ambiguous.

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The Hill

Recent national polls — most notably one from Fox News that incurred the president’s ire — have shown Trump slipping even among groups that have long been perceived as pillars of his support. Kyle Kondik of the UVA Center for Politics said this trend, which has also been seen in other polls, “suggests that even some people who like his job performance remain very conflicted about actually supporting him.”

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CNBC

Founded by Thomas Jefferson, UVA enrolls approximately 16,777 undergraduate students and is known for its law and business schools as well as for its strong athletics program. U.S. News & World Report business program ranking: 8 CNBC Make It ranking: 17, public schools.

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Washington Post

Wedding officiants in the United States fall into two broad categories, UVA law professor Douglas Laycock said: public and private individuals. Judges and government officials such as mayors count as public citizens, while clergy count as private citizens.

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The Associated Press

The city of Norfolk is claiming in a lawsuit that its free speech rights are being violated because a state law won’t let it remove an 80-foot Confederate monument from its downtown. UVA law professor Richard C. Schragger said Norfolk’s lawsuit makes a relatively “novel legal claim that hasn’t been tested in federal court yet.”

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Vanity Fair

Politico consulted the ultimate authority on Biden’s brain: the neurosurgeon who popped his skull open, examined it, and operated following his two aneurysms in 1988. “He is every bit as sharp as he was 31 years ago. I haven’t seen any change,” said Dr. Neal Kassell, now teaching neurosurgery at the University of Virginia. “I can tell you with absolute certainty that he had no brain damage, either from the hemorrhage or from the operations that he had. There was no damage whatsoever.”

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

Jake Greenberg is moving into his second diving season at UVA. Since 2008, he's dreamed of being an Olympian, but those aspirations almost sank in his junior year of high school, when he had surgery to repair a spinal cord cyst. Then his collegiate career took a sudden dive before it even began.

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Washington Post

Once a month, the two African American women walk to the former slave auction block in Charlottesville. UVA professor Jalane Schmidt gestures toward the ground, pointing out a small concrete marker, flush with the brick sidewalk, that declares: “On this site, slaves were bought and sold.” With that, the tour – which will stretch for roughly 90 minutes and take attendees through the history and legacy of Charlottesville’s embattled Confederate monuments – begins.

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Charlottesville Daily Progress

UVA researchers believe they are one step closer to understanding why some people bitten by the Lone Star tick develop an allergy to red meat — and hope they are closer to identifying potential treatments for the allergy.

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Tricycle.org

I spoke with the UVA School of Nursing’s dean emerita, Dorrie Fontaine, about resilience and the helping professions, particularly in health care. During her first year as dean, Fontaine attended Roshi Joan Halifax’s “Being with Dying” training program for health care professionals at Upaya Zen Center in New Mexico. “It was life-changing, and it shaped how I led the school,” she said.  

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Galax Gazette

The Blue Ridge Poison Center at University of Virginia Health and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued an alert about nearly 100 cases of lung illnesses that appear to be linked to vaping.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

(Video) A new program aims to bring advanced graduate students from Brazil to take part in medical research at the University of Virginia.

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Jax Daily Record

The University of Virginia softball star will next lead shopping center giant as it navigates the challenges of the internet era.

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Roanoke Times

Salem is considering legal action to recover nearly seven acres of land at its civic center that were sold for a hotel that was never built. Alex Johnson, a UVA law professor, said the city could file a quiet title action, asking a judge to restore city ownership of the property. Johnson spoke without reviewing any documents or having any direct knowledge of the situation.

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New Atlas

The human immune system is pretty good at wiping out dangerous invaders – which is why some of these invaders have developed ways to avoid detection until they're ready. Now, researchers from the University of Virginia may have found a way to prevent infections by making sure that these bugs are never ready. The team has uncovered how pathogenic E. coli senses its environment to stay stealthy until it reaches the right spot to kickstart an infection.

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CEOWORLD

CEOWORLD magazine took to the photo-sharing platform Instagram and analyzed the number of geotags done on the platform at every single UNESCO World Heritage site across the world. The data they accumulated were then ranked to create the top 100 list. The University of Virginia is No. 54 on the list.

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The College Fix

A UVA spokesperson said the historic institution will continue to mark its Founder’s Day programming despite the Charlottesville City Council’s decision to nix its annual celebration of Thomas Jefferson’s birthday.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

UVA Police have a new device to help fight crime. They are called 'professional mobility devices' and the department has been testing them out for the last week and plan to order four more in the next month.

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Wall Street Journal

In a recent New York Times op-ed, UVA psychologist Daniel Willingham explained the literary technique known as prosody: “the pitch, tempo and stress of spoken words. ‘What a great party’ can be a sincere compliment or sarcastic put-down, but they look identical on the page.” Thus the written word can be ambiguous: “Inferences can go wrong, and hearing the audio version – and therefore the correct prosody – can aid comprehension.”

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BBC

“Soya foods are normally eaten in place of other higher saturated fat foods, such as fatty meat and full-fat dairy products,” says JoAnn Pinkerton, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the UVA Health System. “Whereas most soya foods are naturally low in saturated fat.” 

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