Washington Post

Two initiatives led by local business leaders are coming together, both being created with an eye on Amazon but with the understanding that they are needed regardless. In one, 13 universities, including UVA, agreed to join a group of local corporations in preparing graduates to compete in high-demand areas of data analytics, artificial intelligence, machine learning and cybersecurity.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

“Insulin is a biologic product. It's different, it plays by different rules,” UVA pharmacy supervisor Justin Vesser said. “It was only here in the last 20 years or so that we started to create human versions in labs.” And that's the problem for diabetics: There is no generic version of the drug.

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Inside Higher Ed

Recently, the president of the undergraduate Asian Advocacy Group at the University of Virginia invited me to speak at their spring gala. My subject was how it feels to be a minority (Asian) in a field (Italian) in which there are very few minorities. After the event, I decided to pursue the subject further and contacted 40 minority graduate students and faculty members in Italian, French and Spanish. Their accounts reveal considerable differences in the management of diversity within those fields. 

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

(Video) Outgoing UVA President Teresa Sullivan spoke to a group of seniors about the difference between free speech and hate speech on Thursday.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

(Video) UVA students and graduates gave a lot back to the community on their way out of Charlottesville this year.

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Washington Post

“All of these kinds of rules are designed to deal with a problem, a real problem,” said James Coan, a UVA psychology professor. “But what I think is happening here, although we can all recognize that inappropriate touch is a problem, is that people are not sufficiently recognizing that no touch is also a problem.”

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Bel Marra Health

A new study from the UVA School of Medicine has found that a sensitivity to an allergen found in red meat can lead to a build-up of plaque in the arteries, increasing patients’ risks of developing heart attacks or stroke. The sensitivity is spread by lone star tick bites, which has caused people to develop an allergy to red meat.

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Spectrum

Boys with autism spend almost twice as much time playing video games as typical boys do. And many common game features — including predefined ‘roles’ and goals, and a repetitiveness between levels — seem to mesh well with autism traits, such as social difficulties and a preference for routine, says Micah Mazurek, a UVA associate professor of education. “If we are finding that kids with autism are especially drawn to technology,” he says, “why not try to leverage that interest to design interventions?”

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Facilities Net

For many companies, high financial costs typically stand in the way of simply demolishing their current buildings and redeveloping them with smart technology built in. Arsalan Heydarian, a UVA assistant professor in civil and environmental engineering, says that companies can sometimes get frustrated with technology because it can cause more problems than it solves.

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Journal & Topics Newspapers (Chicago)

We hit the ground in Charlottesville, excited to see the University of Virginia, founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819. Like many schools, UVA has an assortment of guided and self-guided tours, including a smart-phone tour. The historic colonial UVA campus is practically a living museum on its own, with its Jefferson-designed green spaces and rows of colonial

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Fort Worth (Texas) Star-Telegram

“If you don’t field a candidate, there’s a zero percent chance of winning,” said Kyle Kondik, managing editor of Sabato’s Crystal Ball, a newsletter published by UVA’s Center for Politics. “If you do field a candidate, maybe your chance of winning is .001 percent, but there is at least a chance that you could win if the incumbent blows up for some reason.”

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Forbes

“The perception is that you can’t get a visa to enter the United States, there is no immigration to the United States, and there are no jobs available for any foreigner in the U.S.," said Scott Beardsley, dean of UVA’s Darden School of Business. “This is just not the reality we are seeing on the ground.”

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

UVA is moving forward with plans to make the Lawn more wheelchair accessible. The Board of Visitors approved the project Thursday.

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Charlottesville Daily Progress

Today, a growing number of Central Virginians avoid red meat. The allergy has been linked to the bite of the lone-star tick, which is most commonly found in Virginia, Tennessee, southern Missouri and Oklahoma. A new study by a collaboration of UVA allergists and cardiologists has cautiously linked that allergen to an increased risk of heart disease.

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Charlottesville Daily Progress

UVA will move forward this summer with the installation of wheelchair ramps that would allow, for the first time, disabled visitors, students, staff and faculty to move the length of the Lawn.

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Inside Higher Ed

The University of Delaware Press and the University of Virginia Press have announced a collaboration. The Delaware press will maintain editorial offices and its editorial board, but the UVA Press will provide manuscript editorial, design and production services.

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Bloomberg

So what’s stopping employers from offering workers paid family leave? The lack of a federal mandate is one reason, said Christopher Ruhm, professor of public policy and economics at UVA’s Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. Only California, New York, New Jersey, Washington, Rhode Island, and the District of Columbia have some form of paid family leave.

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Live Science

People with a rare red meat allergy may have a higher risk of heart disease, a new study suggests. The lone star tick's saliva may contain alpha-gal, said lead study author Dr. Jeff Wilson, an allergy research fellow at the UVA Health System. So, when the tick bites a person, it exposes the individual to the alpha-gal and may trigger an immune response in the body. Then, when that person eats red meat and some dairy products, the body responds by producing antibodies to alpha-gal, Wilson said.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

Type 1 diabetes is not a preventable disease, but it's one that can hit at any time in a person's life and forever change the course of it. That's what happened to Marshall McIntyre, a Charlottesville man who was forced to start life over. UVA Orthopedic Trauma Director Dr. David Weiss did part of his residency as a flight surgeon. He was trained for what happens in the Air Force in cases like McIntyre's. “There are certain positions that are considered disqualifying, and how disqualifying depends a little bit on what your job is,” said the doctor.

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The Washington Post

(Commentary by James A. Coan, a UVA psychology professor) I study how the brain transforms social connection into better mental and physical health. My research suggests that maintaining close ties to trusted loved ones is a vital buffer against the external stressors we all face. But not being an expert on how this affects children, I recently invited five internationally recognized developmental scientists to chat with me on a science podcast I host.

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