Washington Post

The University of Virginia will open its gates a bit wider to in-state students in the next school year and offer some middle-class families a new tuition break worth $2,000 a year.

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Charlottesville Daily Progress

(Commentary by Bob Gibson, senior researcher at the Academy for Civic Renewal in UVA’s Cooper Center for Public Service) Virginia’s population is still growing, but not as fast as in recent decades, according to population trends examined by the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service.

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C-VILLE Weekly

UVA professor and writer Sydney Blair was generous with her time. She was an integral part of UVA’s MFA program, first as an administrator and then as an associate professor, since her own graduation from the program in 1986.

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Inside Higher Ed

The University of Virginia announced Tuesday that it will add 100 undergraduate slots for Virginians. The university also announced new grants of $2,000 for Virginians from families with incomes of less than $125,000 who do not receive grants or scholarships from other sources.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

The UVA Board of Visitors is taking strides to make college more affordable for students from middle-income households. Tuesday, the board announced the Cornerstone Grants as part of a multi-year strategy to enhance access and affordability for in-state students.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

UVA students are offering free summer camp to children affected by a parent with cancer. Children aged 6 through 18 can apply to attend the weeklong Camp Kesem in August. It's run entirely by undergraduate students from UVA.

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MSUToday

Once upon a time, it was thought that crop diseases affected only crops. New research shows, however, that a common wheat virus can spread and harm perennial native grasses. In the current issue of the Journal of Ecology, researchers from Michigan State University, the University of Kansas and the University of Virginia show that farmers and scientists need to think about how best to protect native plants from diseases emanating from crops.

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Forbes

(By Ed Hess, professor of business administration and Batten Executive-in-Residence at UVA’s Darden School of Business) Many business leaders tell me that one of their top priorities is increasing the quality and speed of their organizational innovation. Faster and better is now being applied to innovation just as it has been applied for decades to operational excellence.

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CBC.ca

For presidents who left the office in disgrace, a transition into private life can have a rehabilitative effect, says Nicole Hemmer, an expert on presidential studies who lectures at UVA’s Miller Center of Public Affairs. Carter was a one-term president "who also left on a sour note," Hemmer says, but "was able to reinvent his career as an advocate for human and civil rights," becoming a beloved figure among Democrats.

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Charlottesville Daily Progress

On the campaign trail, President-elect Donald Trump promised to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. But UVA health policy experts say Trump is likely to take less drastic action, replacing the most controversial parts of the law while preserving the rest of it.

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Charlottesville Newsplex

All week, there will be events around Charlottesville and at the University of Virginia, including films and music as well as national speakers on social justice and equality, to explore the concept of "Silence as Betrayal." There will also be a community forum on planning a memorial to enslaved laborers at UVA on Jan. 23 along with other speakers on a variety of issues and the recent presidential election.

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Charlottesville Daily Progress

Months after the fateful presidential election swung out of his favor, Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., swung by the UVA School of Medicine to share his passion for health care, speak on the dangers of repealing the Affordable Care Act and above all, to listen.

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The Guardian

Before the bunting and barriers are even cleared away from Friday’s inauguration of Donald Trump, hundreds of thousands are likely to attend the Women’s March on Washington the following day. Larry Sabato, director of UVA’s center for Politics, cited anti-Vietnam War demonstrations and civil rights-era protests that attracted crowds up to half a million as among the most prominent in U.S. history.

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Voice of America

From Russia to Iran, and from Pacific trade to nuclear proliferation to climate change, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominees to lead his government this week staked out sharply different positions than those taken by candidate Trump. “It is highly unusual for Cabinet nominees to express their disagreements with their president or president-elect so openly and fully,” said Larry Sabato, director of UVA’s Center for Politics.

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Voice of America

One of the biggest threats to human rights in 2016 was the rise of populism, according to Human Rights Watch, which launched its 2017 report on human rights Thursday in Washington, D.C. The report cites the human rights implications of key elections in the U.S. and around the globe, as well as the refugee crisis and the rise of demagogues. Larry Sabato of UVA’s Center for Politics said too many people are not paying attention.

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The New Journal and Guide

Kenneth S. Stroupe Jr., chief of staff at the UVA Center for Politics and former press secretary for former Virginia Gov. George Allen, wrote that a growing body of research connects gerrymandering with reducing political competition, protecting incumbents, promoting partisan bias and polarization, tamping down voter turnout, increasing voter apathy, heightening legislative gridlock instead of a willingness to find common ground, and enabling a lack of accountability among legislators who occupy politically insulated safe seats.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

U.S. Senator Tim Kaine stopped by the UVA School of Medicine to talk with students about the future of the Affordable Care Act. Kaine says he wanted to get input from the medical students, and find out what's important to them to help him become a better advocate.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

Health care providers and families in Central Virginia are trying to plan ahead, but that's hard when the future of the Affordable Care Act is so uncertain. “There’s a lot of uncertainty, but the way we have planned at this time is we’re assuming that the provisions that are in place will continue,” said UVA Health System Chief Financial Officer Larry Fitzgerald.

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Chemistry World

An electronic sensor for real-time monitoring of drug molecules in the blood soon could continuously guide drug dosing in humans by monitoring drug metabolism or organ function. UVA’s Robin Felder welcomes the advance, commenting that “continuous improvements in aptamer chemistry and biosensor engineering promise a truly bright future for personalized medicine.”

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The Boston Globe

All parents want their children to engage with teachers and develop a caring bond. Now, a new study of the stress levels of preschoolers underscores the health impact of teacher-child relationships. Researchers, including Amanda Williford of the University of Virginia, wanted to see if encouraging a supportive teacher-child relationship could affect that heightened stress level, especially for preschoolers with behavioral problems. Such children are more likely to have higher cortisol levels and sustain those levels during the day, when the hormone should normally decline.

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