The Washington Post

(Commentary by James A. Coan, a UVA psychology professor) I study how the brain transforms social connection into better mental and physical health. My research suggests that maintaining close ties to trusted loved ones is a vital buffer against the external stressors we all face. But not being an expert on how this affects children, I recently invited five internationally recognized developmental scientists to chat with me on a science podcast I host.

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Bearing Drift’s “The Score”

(Podcast) Host Rick Sincere talks with political scientist Todd Sechser of UVA’s Miller Center about the Trump-Kim Summit in Singapore, and with Geoffrey Skelley of the UVA Center for Politics about Virginia’s recent primary elections.

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Medical News Today

For some time now, scientists have believed that allergies, in general, may set off an immunological chain reaction that leads to atherosclerosis, or a buildup of fatty plaque in the arteries that hardens over time, narrowing the blood vessels. However, the mechanisms that underpin this process are not understood. In the new study, researchers at the University of Virginia Health System wanted to dig deeper. So, they devised an experiment to investigate whether individuals with red meat allergies might be more susceptible to atherosclerosis and, if so, why.

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Charlottesville Daily Progress

On June 4, Scott White, the commissioner of insurance for the SCC, sent a letter of guidance to insurers. The new legislation is compliant with state and federal laws, and will take effect on July 1, he said – despite requests from companies to consider a later date, or to allow limited signup periods. White’s statement and the Richmond guidance might help keep prices down, said Carolyn Engelhard, an associate professor at the University of Virginia and director of its health policy program.

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Forbes

(Commentary by Bernie Carlson, Vaughan Professor of Humanities and chair of the UVA’s Engineering & Society Department) Over the past few weeks, the news about Facebook and social media in general has been quite poor. 

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The Atlantic

A 1995 study which suggested that kids from richer families are exposed to more spoken words than those from poorer families has long been the subject of controversy. Now, a new study fails to replicate its central finding. These scholars are concerned that Sperry’s study might lead people to believe that family income doesn’t have any bearing on a kid’s exposure to vocabulary, or that a language-rich home life isn’t important.

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Richmond Times-Dispatch

And Larry Sabato, the UVA political analyst, said Stewart could prove a drag for Republican House candidates, perhaps costing the party two or three seats. Republicans hold seven of 11 seats in the Virginia delegation. “That’s a real one-state contribution to the +23 seats (net) Democrats need nationally,” Sabato said on Twitter.

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“With Good Reason”

(Podcast with Ben Converse, assistant professor of public policy and psychology) Slow-motion replays are ubiquitous in the world of sports, but may be problematic when used in courts of law. 

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Washington Post

The notion of human rights began to take shape after the Holocaust, so it is not surprising that Jews played an important role in their emergence. In his new book, UVA historian James Loeffler explores how a small group of Jewish lawyers and activists from around the world inspired the human rights movement and the creation of entities such as the United Nations that, sadly, have failed to fulfill the promises of their ideals.

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Washington Post

UVA nutrition expert Sibylle Kranz says that for both kids and adults, “weekend dietary intake is very different from weekday. On weekend days, we seem to have more of what we call ‘celebration food.’ It’s birthday parties, or going to the pool and getting something from the vendors there, or families getting together and having big meals.”

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FIND MBA

UVA’s Darden School of Business has announced a new competitive scholarship program designed to support MBA students who are focused on entrepreneurship, innovation and technology.

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Charlottesville Tomorrow

Ice hockey at the University of Virginia has seen two iterations, from 1973 to 1978 and more recently from 1995 to this season’s final hurrah. Both teams experienced success, but the privately owned ice arenas that were their homes have been repurposed. Four UVA alumni associated with those early years and a former coach of the men’s team want to make sure version three is permanent and sustainable.

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MD Magazine

“This novel finding from a small group of subjects from Virginia raises the intriguing possibility that allergy to red meat may be an underrecognized factor in heart disease,” said study leader Dr. Coleen McNamara, a professor of medicine in the Cardiovascular Research Center of the UVA Health System. “These preliminary findings underscore the need for further clinical studies in larger populations from diverse geographic regions and additional laboratory work.”

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Charlottesville Daily Progress

C. Evans Poston Jr. has been appointed to UVA’s Board of Visitors. Norfolk’s commissioner of the revenue since 2014, Poston ran unopposed in 2017 and was a member of Northam’s transition team. He will replace John G. Macfarlane III beginning July 1. Northam reappointed Rector Rusty Conner and members Barbara J. Fried, of Albemarle County-based Fried Companies Inc., and Dr. L.D. Britt, a professor at Eastern Virginia Medical School.

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Education Dive

At the University of Chicago about 20 percent of freshmen choose who is in their room and more than half at the University of Virginia. Students use Facebook or college matchmaking apps – or meetings for accepted students – to find roommates.

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Daily Mail

Scores of Americans may unknowingly have a sensitivity to red meat, which could be raising their risk of heart attacks or strokes, new research claims. But the findings suggest a subgroup of the population may be at a heightened risk for a different reason – a food allergen to a sugary 'toxin', says the research team at the UVA Health System.

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Charlottesville Tomorrow

UVA professor Brian Nosek explained the psychology behind this during a free interactive session Monday evening at the Martin Luther King Performing Arts Center called “Understanding Implicit Bias.” The session discussed how implicit bias can unintentionally influence our judgment and actions through factors that we may not recognize. 

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The National Interest Online

What conventional pundits and partisans have to say about that question is entirely predictable. But Yale University Press has made an effort to provide more serious answers through a new series of books overseen by James Davison Hunter and John M. Owen IV—two professors affiliated with the University of Virginia’s Institute for the Advanced Study of Culture.

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CBC.ca

Brace for Republicans in more Trump-favoring conservative states like North Dakota or Montana to "run as big Trump fans," said Geoffrey Skelley, a political analyst at UVA’s Center for Politics.

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National Catholic Reporter

Pineda-Madrid was praised for her scholarship, her clear and prophetic voice, and her many ministries with and on behalf of women, specifically her ground-breaking work on women's suffering and ritualistic killing in Ciudad Juárez on the Mexican border. "She lifts up the lowly, empowering those who are on the margins of our society, especially those who are most vulnerable to abuse and violence," said Nichole Flores, a UVA assistant professor of religious studies and a former student of Pineda-Madrid.

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