KPFA Radio “Letters and Politics” (Berkeley, Calif.)

(Audio) A conversation on how white supremacists throughout history and now appropriated the classical world to promote their own ideology. We speak to classicist Sarah Teets, a postdoctoral fellow in the College of Arts & Sciences at the University of Virginia who focuses on the classical world.
 

more >
Washington Post

More young families are opting to remain in Alexandria rather than decamping for suburbs in Prince William or Fairfax counties, driving up the city’s school-age population, said Hamilton Lombard, a demographer at the University of Virginia’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service.
 

more >
ABC Radio

There are 15 governorships currently held by Republicans that the University of Virginia Center for Politics rates as either "Lean Republican" or "Toss-up," giving Democrats a vital opportunity to rebuild their strength at the state level. "This year’s midterm is absolutely critical to regaining Democrat strength in governorships and also state legislative seats, where Democrats lost well over 900 during Obama’s two terms as president," Larry Sabato, director of the UVA Center for Politics, said.

more >
The Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg)

At the Center for Politics at the University of Virginia, spokesman and political scientist Geoffrey Skelley said the scandal puts Taylor’s team on the defensive. “It could rub voters the wrong way,” Skelley said before explaining Taylor presents himself as a “conservative, but not too conservative member of Congress who is a Navy SEAL, a straight-laced sharp guy. Obviously, if you can take the shine off of that image to some degree because of this, it’s probably good for Elaine Luria,” Skelley said. “If you can get Brown off the ballot, that’s also probably good for Luria.”
 

more >
Patch

University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville was ranked as the top hospital in Virginia for the third consecutive year.
 

more >
Heavy.com

Tonight, the Human Fountains will perform live on “America’s Got Talent” in the quarterfinals. The group, which includes 2016 UVA graduate Elan Leftin, describes themselves as “a comedy group that creates fountain shows like you’ve never seen before.”
 

more >
Bristol Herald-Courier

James Ryan spent his 14th day as president of the University of Virginia helping new students at the University of Virginia’s College at Wise feel welcome. “You belong here,” Ryan said. “It won’t take long for you to feel at home.” Ryan spoke to the class of 2022 during the fall convocation on Tuesday.
 

more >
Charlottesville Daily Progress

Civil rights activist, author and politician Julian Bond spent the last 20 years of his career teaching at the University of Virginia. The school possesses copies of many of his papers, speeches and other works in its special collections archives. Up until now, those materials have been difficult to access, requiring a visit to the archives. UVA is looking to change that.
 

more >
Quartz.com

In his 2015 book “Raising Kids Who Read,” UVA psychology professor Daniel Willingham explains the concept of “virtuous cycle” of reading. Children who read well tend to enjoy reading; because they enjoy reading, they read more; because they read more, they become better readers. But how do you generate literary enthusiasm among kids who are not in the virtuous cycle? 
 

more >
Forbes

“A number of birds (e.g., eagles, hawks) were significant in different cultures for many reasons, but I’ve never read anything about them being bred in a prehistoric village,” said co-author of the study, archaeologist Stephen Plog, at the University of Virginia. “Even today, for example, eagles are very important in Hopi ritual, but they are gathered from nesting sites just before the birds are ready to fledge and then are raised in the pueblos.”
 

more >
iol Property (South Africa)

The PRA report included a case study on South Africa titled Pursuing Property Titles for Low Income Households in South Africa compiled by Jessica Canada, a Ph.D. student in economics at the University of Virginia and Jason Urbach, a director of the Free Market Foundation.
 

more >
Blouin ArtInfo

"Colors" takes as its point of departure a poem written by then twelve-year-old Zoe Kusyk, a student in Charlottesville, Virginia, a 2016 winner of “Writer’s Eye,” an annual competition held by the Fralin Museum of the University of Virginia that “challenges writers of all ages to create original works of poetry and prose inspired by works of art on display in the Museum.” “Colors,” was a response to a 1977 painting by Larry Poons, a cascade of liquid hues pulled by gravity into parallel but active rivulets, now remaining distinct, now mingling.
 

more >
Richmond Times-Dispatch

A woman who claims innocence in a “shaken baby” case was released from prison Monday into the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials for deportation to her native Peru. After completing a 10-year sentence, Trudy Eliana Munoz Rueda, 53, waved to her two daughters, a sister, her brother in-law and two lawyers with the University of Virginia School of Law Innocence Project around 9:30 a.m. as she was escorted to a government van parked at the Fluvanna Correctional Center for Women.

more >
War on the Rocks

(Commentary by Brad Carson, a professor at UVA’s Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy) The Department of Defense is overhauling the military personnel system for the first time in a generation. And the changes, some large, others small, all indicate that the department has finally embraced the “talent management” revolution that swept the private sector more than two decades ago.
 

more >
The Atlantic

The poetry world would hardly seem a likely place for a “race row,” the phrase The Guardian applied in 2011 to a blunt exchange of literary verdicts. The celebrated (and white) critic Helen Vendler had disparaged the celebrated (and black) poet Rita Dove’s selections for the new Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry. Dove, Vendler wrote, had favored “multicultural inclusiveness” over quality. Dove took strong exception to a pattern she saw in the response of established white critics.
 

more >
Charlottesville Daily Progress

Carolyn Engelhard, a public-health specialist and an associate professor at the University of Virginia, said Charlottesville-area consumers shouldn’t just look at the price of Anthem’s plans, but should compare provider networks and pharmaceutical coverage. “It’s really interesting that they decided to enter now,” Engelhard said. “But it’s a matter of looking at whether the plans are really better for consumers.”
 

more >
Christian Science Monitor

Beginning with Franklin Delano Roosevelt, a string of presidents used taping equipment with varying degrees of enthusiasm. Their motives ranged from defending themselves against inaccurate news leaks (F.D.R), to help in preparing memoirs and developing political leverage. Along the way, these tapes become an invaluable historical resource, says Dr. Marc Selverstone, an associate professor in presidential studies at the University of Virginia's Miller Center, and chair of the Center's Presidential Recordings Program.

more >
War on the Rocks

Skeptics dismissed Operation Desert Storm, fought from mid-January to the end of February 1991, as a “video-game war,” over almost before it began. Stump disagreed. The war “was a really big deal… It validated that America was back in business.” Such sentiment worried the University of Virginia’s Elizabeth K. Meyer, a professor of landscape architecture, and the lone dissenter on the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, the body entrusted with the task of deciding what does or does not get built in the nation’s capital. When the commission heard testimony from Stump and others, Meyer pushed back.

more >
Charlottesville Daily Progress

Gloria Graham, the University of Virginia’s vice president of safety and security, said UVA officials worked with the student organizers of Saturday’s protest and supported them wholeheartedly, “It was a peaceful protest, and we support peaceful protests,” she said. 
 

more >
Scienmag

Somewhere in the American Southwest or northern Mexico, there are probably the ruins of a scarlet macaw breeding operation dating to between 900 and 1200 C.E., according to a team of archaeologists – including UVA archaeology professor Stephan Plog – who sequenced the mitochondrial DNA of bird remains found in the Chaco Canyon and Mimbres areas of New Mexico.
 

more >