Los Angeles Business Journal

Oaktree Capital Management’s Bruce Karsh and his wife Martha have announced plans to donate $25 million towards a $44 million total gift to the UVA Law School, where the couple first met as law students. The donation, which was announced at a dinner on May 10, is the largest in the law school’s history and will be made in stages through 2022.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

The UVA School of Law is kicking off its bicentennial with millions of extra dollars. Alumni Martha and Bruce Karsh announced Thursday that they will be donating $43.9 million to the school.

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Charlottesville Daily Progress

Two UVA School of Law alumni will give the school $43.9 million, the largest gift in the school’s history. The donation from Bruce and Martha Karsh, which will be fully funded in 2022, will cover the law school’s student scholarship program, which will be renamed the Karsh-Dillard Scholarships; establish the Karsh Center for Law and Democracy, which will support interdisciplinary programs on the rule of law and civic engagement and discourse; and create a professorships fund to support the center’s faculty.

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Charlottesville Newsplex

The UVA School of Law is getting the largest gift in its history. Martha and Bruce Karsh will donate almost $44 million to the school where they met. 

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Richmond Times-Dispatch

Brandon Garrett, a professor at the UVA School of Law, was skeptical that the obligation to hand over information to the defense during the pretrial process known as discovery was causing that much more work.

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Scientific American (blog)

Finally, some people might argue that neither life satisfaction, positive emotions nor absence of depression are enough for happiness. Instead, something more is required: One has to experience one’s life as meaningful. But when Shigehiro Oishi of UVA and Ed Diener of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign compared 132 different countries based on whether people felt that their life has an important purpose or meaning, African countries including Togo and Senegal were at the top of the ranking, while the U.S. and Finland were far behind.

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Cosmos

Andrew Sheaff, a UVA assistant swimming and diving coach, agrees that acoustics might help coaches identify previously overlooked nuances in swimming technique. “I’m always looking for ways to identify the characteristics for fast swimming,” he says.

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Charlottesville Daily Progress

University of Virginia Police Chief Michael Gibson will retire this summer, according to President Teresa Sullivan. A Crozet native, Gibson has been chief since 2007. He moved through the ranks at UVA, starting in 1982 as a patrol officer. He later served as a general investigator, narcotics investigator, sergeant and shift commander.

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Your Tango

New research suggests that the link between financial insecurity and pain may be driven, at least in part, by feeling a lack of control over one's life. "Overall, our findings reveal that it physically hurts to be economically insecure," UVA researcher Eileen Chou said. "Results from six studies establish that insecurity produces physical pain, reduces pain tolerance and predicts over-the-counter painkiller consumption."

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Macleans

Being married combines “sex, parenthood, economic cooperation and emotional intimacy into a permanent union,” observes Bradford Wilcox, a UVA sociologist and co-author of the above report. It also makes you happy.

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Charlottesville Newsplex

The UVA Cyber Defense Team won this year's National Collegiate Cyber Defense Championship in Orlando, Florida last month in its first try competing.

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NBC “Today”

UVA literature professor Andrew Kaufman started a unique program where college students and incarcerated youth study together. The class has changed the lives of several people, including Joshua Pritchett, a young man who was formerly imprisoned and is now studying at UVA.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

Volunteers looking to enhance their emergency response skills got a chance to do so during a mock disaster scenario on Thursday. The Charlottesville, University of Virginia, Albemarle Community Emergency Response Team, better known as CERT, held its team training for beginners to bump their skills up to the next level.

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New York Times

“There’s definitely an opportunity for there to be kind of a Trump backlash in this district,” said Kyle Kondik, an analyst at UVA’s Center for Politics, who wrote a book about Ohio’s presidential voting history. He said it was the kind of district filled with Republicans who might think that someone like George W. Bush, Mitt Romney or John Kasich “is a better fit for their sensibilities” than Trump.

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Phys.Org

UVA researchers are using neutrons to explore fundamental work in residual stress mapping that promises more precise science down the road for Oak Ridge National Laboratory and similar facilities around the world. 

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WHSV ABC-3 (Harrisonburg)

For years, neonatal intensive care unit nurses have struggled with preventing premature babies from yanking on their breathing tubes: a serious problem impacting these small babies. A UVA Health System nurse has devised a solution to this problem with a special "hug."

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India New England

The University of Virginia is offering “Foundations of Medical Yoga for Health Professionals” this fall. This three-credit course “will provide graduate students, medical students and practicing health professionals with a foundational understanding of medical yoga to improve health and wellness from a historical, theoretical and research perspective,” the announcement states.

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WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

The UVA Medical Center is working with health care providers across the state on inclusion and diversity training. The 2018 LGBTQ health care symposium was held Thursday at the Boar's Head Inn.

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Charlottesville Newsplex

Sheetz held a food drive at its location in UVA’s Corner shopping district Tuesday afternoon to give students a chance to donate to Blue Ridge Area Food Bank.

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Politifact

Saikrishna Prakash, UVA law professor and Miller Center senior fellow, said the court might decide that asking for a set of materials, such as tapes, is different from demanding that the president sit down for an interview. Trump’s lawyers are laying the groundwork to argue that a subpoena for questioning would be overly broad, he added.

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