Grants Awarded for Courses That Connect University with Community

July 10, 2009 — University of Virginia faculty members have received 12 grants to develop courses that will bring U.Va. closer to its surrounding community.

Faculty members will use their 2009 Academic Community Engagement grants to create new courses or revise existing ones to incorporate community service or a community-based research project.

The grants were awarded by the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost. J. Milton Adams, vice provost for academic programs, said the grants and the Jefferson Public Citizens program for students are part of "an intentional effort to connect public service to academics, to prepare students for life after college."

Students applying to the Jefferson Public Citizen program, launched by the Office of University and Community Partnerships this spring, are encouraged to enroll in Academic Community Engagement courses. Organizations that are interested in these programs are encouraged to visit the Web site for more information about the community-based research projects being carried out locally.

This year's Academic Community Engagement recipients are:

• Andrew Kaufman from the College of Arts & Sciences to work with the Jefferson Trail Treatment Center for Children;

• Betsy Roettger from the School of Architecture to work with Virginia Supportive Housing;

• Carol Ann Spreen from the Curry School of Education to work with the Legal Aid Justice Center, Immigrant Advocacy Program/Just Children, Human Rights Clinic, U.Va. Law School, and Albemarle and Charlottesville City Schools;

• Kent Wayland from the School of Engineering and Applied Science to develop cross-cultural understanding of public service and research;

• Betsy Tucker from the College of Arts & Sciences to work with the Department of Juvenile Justice and the Culpeper Juvenile Correctional Center;

• Diane Whaley and Robin Shroyer from the Curry School of Education to work with the Charlottesville Obesity Task Force;

• John Quale from the School of Architecture to work with People Incorporated of Virginia;

• Diane Boyer and Cathy Campbell from the School of Nursing to work with Healthy Appalachia;

• Paige Pullen from the Curry School of Education to work with Paul H. Cale Elementary School;

• Tanya Denckla Cobb from the Institute for Environmental Negotiation and Timothy Beatley from the School of Architecture to work with the Jefferson Area Board for Aging and the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Committee;

• Winx Lawrence with the Curry School of Education to work with Albemarle and Charlottesville public schools;

• Scot French from the College of Arts & Sciences and Bill Ferster from the Virginia Center for Digital History to work with the Public Housing Association of Residents.

Details about faculty members' proposals are on the Web site of the Office for University Community Partnerships.