Even an institution as historic as the University of Virginia, now entering its third century, has stories yet to be told. Some are inspiring, while the truths of others are painful, but necessary for a fuller accounting of the past.

The University’s President’s Commissions on Slavery and on the University in the Age of Segregation were established to find and tell those stories. Here are some of them, written by those who did the research.

These are stories of discrimination and oppression. And they are stories of inspiration and determination. Together, they contribute to the University’s efforts to explore and present a more complete account of its past so that it can better fulfill its values in the future. 

Published as a series on UVA Today during the 2019 fall semester, the stories are written by faculty authors and by researchers who serve as members of the Commission on Segregation, or who conducted research as part of the commission’s work. 

Established in 2018 at the direction of then-President Teresa A. Sullivan and supported by current President Jim Ryan, the commission complements the findings and recommendations of the President’s Commission on Slavery and the University, which concluded its formal work last year.

New stories will publish occasionally and will be added here throughout the fall. Check back for more.

One in an occasional series about the findings of the President’s Commissions on Slavery and on the University in the Age of Segregation. Today’s installment explores the intersection of the KKK, Charlottesville and the University.
One in a series about the findings of the President’s Commissions on Slavery and on the University in the Age of Segregation. This installment explores the legacy of a former slave who excelled as an entrepreneur and advanced the lives of local African Americans.
One in an occasional series about the findings of the President’s Commissions on Slavery and on the University in the Age of Segregation. Today’s installment explores the commonality of blackface performance and other dehumanizing behaviors and their influence on a segregated society.
One in an occasional series about the findings of the President’s Commissions on Slavery and on the University in the Age of Segregation. Today’s installment explores UVA’s role in promulgating a racist post-Civil War creed known as the “Lost Cause.”